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RIT develop technology to stop deep fake videos

Local News

One of the biggest concerns of the 2016 campaign wasn’t just the prevalence of fake news stories, but the fact that so many believed them.

Students at the Rochester Institute of Technology say they are developing technology designed to sniff out so-called deep fake videos, so they will know whether what they have seen has been altered.

Saniat Sohrawarti is an RIT researcher and says deception is getting more complicated. “Most of us don’t really know this can be fake, so we believe if someone is speaking on the video it’s probably real,” says Sohrawarti. Now scammers can easily manipulate text, photoshop images, and change videos showing someone saying things they never did and make it believable.

RIT is working to get a watchdog program together to catch these fake videos and to make them available for the public and the media.

Matthew Wright, the Director of the Center for Cybersecurity says, “Platforms like Twitter and Facebook could adopt our technologies being developed by researchers to detect these deep fake videos and stop them before they become viral.” Research focused on not only detecting these fake videos but studying people and how and why they could get fooled, to keep the public ahead of the scams.

To spot fake news content and prevent it from going viral, here are some things you can do:

  • Always double check the source of the information
  • Don’t just share something you see that is shocking
  • Investigate content
  • Check multiple sources

It’s important to watch not just on your phone, but maybe on your laptop, and look to see what people are saying about the video.

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