Jurors deliberated for approximately 26 hours over the course of 5 days before reaching four verdicts in the murder trial of Craig Rideout.

Each defendant faced charges of second-degree murder and tampering with evidence in the July 2016 death of Craig. Laura Rideout was also charged with second-degree burglary.

The jury rendered the following verdicts Tuesday afternoon:

Laura Rideout
Murder 2nd: Guilty
Two counts of tampering with evidence: Guilty
Burglary 2nd: Guilty

Colin Rideout
Murder 2nd: Guilty
Two counts of tampering with evidence: Guilty

Alex Rideout
Murder 2nd: Not guilty
Two counts of tampering with evidence: Guilty

Paul Tucci
Murder 2nd: Not guilty
Two counts of tampering with evidence: Not guilty

The second-degree murder charge carries a prison sentence of between 15 and 25 years to life. The tampering with evidence charge carries a maximum sentence of four years in prison. The burglary charge carries a sentence of three and a half to fifteen years in prison.

Laura, Colin, and Alex Rideout will be sentenced on September 1.

Assistant District Attorney Tim Prosperi, who was a prosecutor in the case, says while the DA’s office had hoped to see all four defendants convicted of murder, they were satisfied as the jury did a thorough job in its deliberations.

“It was a fair trial with all four defendants, and the jury saw the evidence one way, whether we disagree with it or not,” said Prosperi. “They did a careful job.”

Colin’s attorney Matt Parrinello says some of the evidence was difficult for the jury and that it may have spilled over — one of the reasons he and the other defense teams had repeatedly asked for separate trials throughout the process. 

“This has been a very long, hard, trial for everyone involved,” said Tucci’s lawyer, Michael Schiano. “The jury spent almost five days going through this. I think they worked very hard, they listened to everything we had to say.”

Colin’s attorney Matt Parrinello says some of the evidence was difficult for the jury and that it may have spilled over — one of the reasons he and the other defense teams had repeatedly asked for separate trials throughout the process. 

Craig’s mother and his sister spoke to the media after the verdict was read.

Robbyn Drew, Craig’s sister, says she’s pleased the jury came to the decision they did, but it comes with mixed emotions.

“We’ll never get him back, but we have some answers,” said Drew. “I’m very sorry for my mom and the other parents and the other families because this has not only affected my family, but their families as well.”

“He meant a lot to me,” said Agnes Rideout, Craig’s mom. “I’m just pleased to have justice for him but as a grandmother, I do have mixed emotions.”

Drew also thanked the people who have been supporting and praying for her family.