Future of non-profit operating on Pittsford horse farm in jeopardy

Local News

A horse farm in Pittsford that has been around for more than six decades is on the market. The impending sale means the future of a non-profit that operates on that land is in jeopardy.

Jack Frohm bought High View Farms as a young man in 1958. Now, at 86, he, his wife, and his son are getting ready to retire. 

“When I was a boy I had a dream I wanted to work with horses and own a horse farm,” Frohm said. “I’ve had that. Neither Mark nor I are able to ride anymore… and it’s time to sell.”

In the last six decades, the Frohms hosted horse shows, taught riding lessons, and trained all types of horses.

Even though the 59-acre property is now on the market, the horses still need to be taken care of.

There are more than 30 horses on the farm, like Rainbow’s End, but the Frohm’s say depending on the buyer, they’re going to work to make sure they have homes.

On the other side of the barn, is the same concern. Matt Doward has rented space from the Frohms for 12 years, operating a program for urban youth called ‘A Horses Friend.’

“Horses are peaceful,” Doward said. “They’re relaxing. Most city kids will never get the opportunity to be around a horse. So, it’s just something new and different, and it’s a great way to expose them to different careers.” 

While the Frohms are hanging up their hats, Doward says he’d like to continue his work but he’s not sure where.

“This is the only thing I want to do right now, so I’m not looking to do anything different, but first and foremost is the horses that are here,” Doward said. “And making sure that no matter what I decide to do, that they’re actually still going to have a great home.”

Doward, like the Frohms, hopes the future owner of High View will continue operating it as a horse farm.

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