Shortly after the completion of the Erie Canal, the Village of Brockport was established in 1829. But, the nearly 190 year old village, may no longer be a village. 
 
Front yards are covered with signs saying, “vote yes” or ” vote no.” A yes vote is for dissolving the village. A no vote is for keeping it. 
 
The mayor of the village says for the sake of quality of life, the village must remain.
 
“I don’t think this would be a really nice village to live in if dissolution happens,” said Mayor Margaret Blackman.  
 
People for dissolution say for the sake of their wallets, the village must go. 
 
“The village government, they’re doing better over the last bunch of years but another 25% tax increase since the last vote and they said they would try harder, and they have. They’ve  improved the status of the village government, but it’s been on the backs of the people and that is a shame,” said Rhett King, a Brockport resident for dissolution. 
  
If the Village of Brockport is dissolved, over 50 workers will lose their jobs.
 
Right now, there is no plan in place for how the village would dissolve into the town of Sweden. The village board voted down funding for a study earlier this year. But, the village would have to create a plan if the yes vote wins. 
 
“They’re using that as a sword and a shield,” said King about the lack of post-dissolution plan. “Because now, they’re saying there is no plan. They had the opportunity and the excuse is the town ultimately makes the decision.”
 
If no wins, the mayor wants to the community to come together to create a better Brockport.
 
“We want people to work with us. We want people with ideas. We want people to think about how we can reduce tax payer cost, because we care about that too. We’re taxpayers,” said Mayor Blackman.
 
If dissolution is approved tomorrow, the village has 180 days to develop a plan. There could be a second vote on dissolution if a referendum is proposed and then passed. 
 
If the dissolution is not approved, there can’t be another dissolution vote for at least another four years. 
 
Polls are open tomorrow from noon to nine.