Monroe County’s Halloween 2020 health and safety guidelines for trick-or-treating

Halloween

ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — The coronavirus pandemic continues to present challenges at every turn, and trick-or-treating is no exception.

Monroe County Public Health Commissioner previously stated that trick-or-treating could happen for families this year, as long as proper safety precautions were put in place.

“We’re lucky that our infection rate is relatively low here, and going into Halloween, I think there are ways we can have trick-or-treating — and do so safely,” Dr. Mendoza said in late September.

This week, the Monroe County Department of Public Health has been releasing a list of recommendations to do just that:

Masks

Do — Wear a proper mask that covers your nose and mouth when you are trick-or-treating, or handing out candy. Make sure the mask stays dry.

Don’t — Wear a consume mask unless you also have a snug-fitting proper mask on beneath it and can breath easily.

Distancing

Do — Stay at least six feet away from others who are not in your household.

Don’t — Gather in large groups, or host big parties, especially indoors.

Candy distribution

Do — Wash or sanitize your hands often when you are handing out candy or filling goody bags. Clean frequently touched surfaces, like the doorbell, throughout the evening.

Don’t — Use a big bowl to distribute candy. Instead, the homeowner should drop treats into each child’s bag or line pieces up on the driveway or a table.

Sanitize and symptom monitoring

Do — Wash or sanitize your hands before you take off your mask and start eating your candy.

Don’t — Trick-or-treat or hand out candy if you are sick, in isolation, or mandatory quarantine, or are considered to be at high risk for developing sever symptoms of COVID-19.

Gatherings

Do — Choose outdoor festivities over indoor festivities.

Don’t — Participate in activities that involve a lot of screaming, shouting, or singing within 12 feet of other individuals, especially indoors.

Bobbing for apples

Don’t — No do’s for this one. Health officials say bobbing for applies is a bad idea.

Reminder

Do’s

  • Wear a proper mask that covers your nose and mouth when you are trick-or-treating, or handing out candy. Make sure the mask stays dry.
  • Stay at least six feet away from others who are not in your household.
  • Wash or sanitize your hands often when you are handing out candy or filling goody bags. Clean frequently touched surfaces, like the doorbell, throughout the evening.
  • Wash or sanitize your hands before you take off your mask and start eating your candy.
  • Choose outdoor festivities over indoor festivities.

Don’ts

  • Wear a consume mask unless you also have a snug-fitting proper mask on beneath it and can breath easily.
  • Gather in large groups, or host big parties, especially indoors.
  • Use a big bowl to distribute candy. Instead, the homeowner should drop treats into each child’s bag or line pieces up on the driveway or a table.
  • Trick-or-treat or hand out candy if you are sick, in isolation, or mandatory quarantine, or are considered to be at high risk for developing sever symptoms of COVID-19.
  • Participate in activities that involve a lot of screaming, shouting, or singing within 12 feet of other individuals, especially indoors.
  • Health officials say bobbing for applies is a bad idea.

Check back with News 8 WROC as we will continue to update this developing story with more local health and safety guidelines for Halloween 2020.

CDC issues Halloween 2020 guidelines, color-coded COVID-19 risk map

CHICAGO, I.L. (NewsNation) – What will Halloween look like this year? One thing’s for sure. It will no doubt be different than years past.

Halloween 2020 converges with a full moon, a blue moon, Daylight Saving Time — and it falls on a Saturday.

Of course, the holiday is also happening during the COVID-19 pandemic.

This week, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) issued new coronavirus guidelines and an interactive map to help families stay safe this Halloween.

The CDC created an interactive map on its website with color-coded risk levels for each county throughout the country. There are four risk levels: green, yellow, orange, and red — with green representing the least amount of risk and red being the most. The colors are based on the current COVID-19 case and death count data

The map was developed by the Harvard Global Health Institute.

“Families and policy-makers need clear and consistent information when it comes to COVID-19 risks to inform decision-making, including how to participate safely in the upcoming Halloween holiday and trick-or-treating activities associated with it,” said Dr. Ingrid Katz, Infectious Diseases Expert, and Associate Faculty Director at the Harvard Global Health Institute.

They also have recommended activities based on the risk zone.

Green Zone

In the green zone, the CDC says trick or treating can proceed normally, as long as social distancing guidelines are in place. Small parties with close friends are OK as well.

Yellow Zone

In the yellow zone, trick or treating is still possible, but the CDC says to make sure the places you are visiting follow safety protocols so you can stay safe. Any partygoers should be wearing face masks indoors.

Orange Zone

In the orange zone, the CDC recommends “trick or treat in reverse!” This means that kids can get dressed up in their favorite costumes and hang out in their front yards, and neighbors can walk or drive by and deliver candy to kids. Parties should be outdoors only with social distancing guidelines followed.

Red Zone

In the red zone, trick or treating is not recommended. The CDC says there are too many risks involved. Instead, they recommend Zoom parties, Netflix parties, and setting up candy stations inside and outside of the house for kids to discover throughout the night.

The CDC advises that you use the map to make sure your county is safe and follow social distancing guidelines.

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