ROCHESTER, N.Y. (WROC) — Two local recycling companies have been convicted of illegally processing 800 tons of electronic waste in Wayne County, according to New York Attorney General Letitia James and the Department of Environmental Conservation.

In the statement released Thursday, the state agencies detailed the guilty pleas from ALPCO Recycling, based out of Macedon, along with owner Alton Plumb, Jr. and Finger Lakes Cleanup and Recycling Consultants, with their project manager Craig Foster.

The AG and DEC said in 2015, a large amount of e-waste was taken to and left at the Geneva Enterprise Development Center in Seneca County. This waste included televisions, computer monitors, which are hazardous and contain lead.

Finger Lakes Cleanup and Recycling Consultants was hired to clean up the abandoned e-waste in 2016. The company asked ALPCO Recycling to assist in the cleanup, knowing they did not have a permit, and were not authorized to process the waste, according to the statement.

Despite this, FLCRC entered an agreement with ALPCO, and they processed 800 tons of e-waste.

Following this, the ALPCO site was subsequently remediated, and all remaining e-waste at the site was properly disposed of — at ALPCO’s cost.

According to the state, Foster and Finger Lakes Cleanup and Recycling Consultants pleaded guilty Wednesday in Wayne County Court. Foster pleaded guilty to unauthorized possession, disposal, and dealing in hazardous wastes. Foster was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge.

Finger Lakes Cleanup and Recycling Consultants pleaded guilty to unlawful dealing in hazardous wastes in the first degree and was sentenced to a three-year conditional discharge.

Additionally, they were both fined $5,000 each. 

ALPCO previously pleaded guilty to violating the state’s Environmental Conservation Law. Plumb was sentenced to a one-year conditional discharge and paid a $1,500 fine. Most recently, according to the statement, ALPCO, pleaded guilty to unauthorized possession, disposal, and dealing in a hazardous waste, and was sentenced to an unconditional charge.

Plumb also previously agreed to a DEC consent order, which required him to pay $225,000 in civil penalties for Environmental Conservation Law and permit violations.