Kevyn Adams promoted to Sabres GM after nine years working with Pegulas

Buffalo Sabres

OTTAWA, CANADA – FEBRUARY 05: Assistant coach Kevyn Adams of the Buffalo Sabres talks with player Thomas Vanek #26 of the Buffalo Sabres during an NHL game against the Ottawa Senators at Scotiabank Place on February 5, 2013 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. (Photo by Jana Chytilova/Freestyle Photography/Getty Images)

Kim and Terry Pegula did not need to search far to find Jason Botterill’s replacement. Kevyn Adams was named the new Sabres general manager without a formal search.

An in-house hire, the Pegulas made the decision to promote Adams just three weeks after announcing they would support Botterill through next season.

“There were too many differences in opinion going into the future we thought would be best for us,” said Terry Pegula.

Adams most recently acted as the Sabres’ Senior Vice President of Business Administration, and has worked with the Pegulas for the past nine years.

“We kept jamming him with responsibilities and he kept climbing up the ladder,” said Terry Pegula. “He’s a very knowledgable and passionate person, a great communicator.”

Born in Western New York, Adams says being named the Sabres general manager is a “dream come true” for him and his family.

“I’m so excited to start this job and learn from Ralph Krueger and his staff, work side by side on a daily basis,” said Adams. “I believe winning is doing it all together. We’re going to move forward and be positive.”

He plans to reach out to every NHL general manager to get to know them a little more, as well as work closely with head coach Ralph Krueger to innovate the roster and reinvigorate the current frustrated players.

“When you have a buy in to a coach, so many big things can happen,” said Adams. “It’s up to us to collaboratively look into it, how we can improve.”

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